Adams downplays latest NYC subway attack as outlier, says majority of riders commute ‘without any encounters’


New York City Mayor Eric Adams downplayed the latest subway attack, arguing that most New Yorkers use the system without issue. 

“We’re going to deal with those crimes that take place and we’re going to continue to work on those six felony crimes a day that we’re witnessing,” he said Wednesday, the New York Post reported.

“But I know that 3.5 million people use our system every day without any encounters.”

“That’s the combination: those type of incidents are impacting people feeling unsafe,” he told the media. 

VIOLENT SUBWAY SHOVE CAUGHT ON CAMERA SPARKS OUTRAGE AFTER MAYOR PROMISED TO FLOOD WITH POLICE

A good Samaritan was stabbed on the No. 6 train just ahead of 6 a.m. Wednesday at the Brooklyn Bridge-City Hall. The 31-year-old man was trying to break up a fight between two women when one of the women repeatedly stabbed him in the neck, shoulder and arm, the New York Post reported, citing police. 

NYC SUBWAY ATTACK VICTIM SLAMS CITY OFFICIALS OVER ‘DANGEROUS’ TRANSIT SYSTEM: ‘THERE’S NO HELP THERE’

Adams said later that day he would contact the victim, describing him as an “innocent person,” who “was for my understanding trying to stop the dispute.”

Since 2020, there have been 21 killings in the subway system, the New York Post reported earlier this month. The figure is more than the 20 murders recorded between 2008 and 2019 combined, according to the data. 

Video released by the NYPD earlier this month showed one attack in the subway system where a suspect shoved a victim onto the tracks. Witnesses helped pull the man to the platform before the train could hit him, according to the NYPD. 

That attack set off criticisms that more police officers need to be stationed in the transit system to help protect riders. 

NEW YORK CITY SUBWAY ASSAULT VICTIM ACCUSES MAYOR OF BREAKING PROMISES 

“I check what time the train comes and then I go. They should have more cops in the stations,” one Manhattan commuter told CBS News at the time. 

“I worry about the safety, yes. It’s a hard environment,” another person said. 

The mayor laid blame for “the perception of fear” among New Yorkers on the media last week during an interview, arguing the media highlights reports of attacks “on the front pages of your paper every day.”

Adams promised more police presence within the subway system back in April. Over the weekend, he and Gov. Kathy Hochul announced an additional 1,200 law enforcement shifts to the subways. 

Adams said Wednesday that cops aren’t in “every station in the city, every day.” He added: “But we are strategically placing those officers during the ridership times, during when we see the crimes are taking place.”

“We’re properly deploying and I see a complete, all-hands-on-deck.”

The latest New York City subway attack in which a Good Samaritan was stabbed was an outlier, Mayor Eric Adams said, citing data showing most residents commute without incident.

Go to Source