International Space Station moves to avoid orbital debris


The International Space Station moved Monday to avoid orbital debris. 

In a blog post, NASA said the ISS Progress 81 thrusters fired for over five minutes in what it called a Pre-Determined Debris Avoidance Maneuver (PDAM). 

The ISS shifted an “extra measure of distance away” from the predicted track of a fragment of Russian Cosmos 1408 debris.

The thruster fired at 8:25 p.m. ET. 

THE LAST SOLAR ECLIPSE OF 2022 STUNS SKYWATCHERS

There was no impact on space station operations.

Without the maneuver, it was predicted that the fragment could have passed within about 3 miles of the station.

The PDAM increased the station’s altitude by two-tenths of a mile at apogee – the ISS is in low Earth orbit – and eight-tenths of a mile at perigee. The apogee is the point in the elliptical orbit path of a satellite at which it is farthest from the Earth.

According to NASA, Cosmos 1408 was a Russian ELINT Tselina-D satellite launched from the Plesetsk cosmodrome. 

NASA TEAM TO STUDY UFOS, RELEASE REPORT TO PUBLIC IN 2023

It was designed to determine the precise location, activity and other details of radio emitters. That data would be stored on board and downloaded to Russian ground stations.

On Nov. 15, 2021, Cosmos 1408 – no longer operational – was destroyed in a Russian kinetic anti-satellite test. 

That test generated a cloud of debris, including some 1,500 pieces of trackable size.

NASA said the International Space Station used its thrusters on Monday to avoid orbital debris, moving an “extra measure of distance away” from the fragment.

Go to Source